SCUC-CCP :: Selective Cause Until it is Concluded : Coronavirus Covid-19 Pandemic

responding covid-19 pandemic

SCUC-CCP :: Selective Cause Until it is Concluded : Coronavirus Covid-19 Pandemic


What  Wikipedia / Google Says
About ‘Coronavirus Covid-19 Pandemic‘ ? :
Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a newly discovered coronavirus.
 
Most people who fall sick with COVID-19 will experience mild to moderate symptoms and recover without special treatment.
 
 
HOW IT SPREADS
 
The virus that causes COVID-19 is mainly transmitted through droplets generated when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or exhales. These droplets are too heavy to hang in the air, and quickly fall on floors or surfaces.
 
You can be infected by breathing in the virus if you are within close proximity of someone who has COVID-19, or by touching a contaminated surface and then your eyes, nose or mouth.

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The COVID-19 pandemic is sparking an era of ‘smart generosity’

The COVID-19 pandemic is sparking an era of ‘smart generosity’

UPDATES: COVID-19

By Carol Cone and Kristin Kenney4 minute Read

During challenging times, companies with purpose are often better positioned to adapt and endure than peers without a purpose. Why? Purpose serves as a vision and lens for smart decision-making during both good times and bad. More than just a reason for existing, purpose can help leaders prioritize stakeholders, redirect resources, and more precisely respond during crises such as COVID-19.

Historically, what we today call purpose is based on the evolution of various linkages between companies and causes, from philanthropy and cause branding to corporate citizenship and CSR. COVID-19 is forcing the next iteration of purpose, one that falls in line with the emerging stakeholder capitalism movement. This is taking shape as “smart generosity”—the innovative application of a company’s resources (cash, personnel, operations, reinvented products/services) toward an urgent social issue, which puts the needs of stakeholders before short-term profits.

Think: Allstate returning $600 million in premiums back to customers who are driving less; Microsoft offering 12 weeks’ paid parental leave to any full-time employee juggling homeschool with work; or Dick’s Sporting Goods’ CEO and president forgoing their salaries for the year.

Given the unprecedented nature of this pandemic, these corporate actions were not planned for or forecasted. But many were guided by a core purpose, strong corporate values, and a commitment to do the right thing for all stakeholders—not just shareholders. In fact, “shareholders come last” in the pandemic, Mark Cuban said to Just Capital. We will only come back stronger if companies focus on supporting their employees and all the other stakeholders critical to their business growth.

Here’s how companies are putting their purpose to work through smart generosity:

1. They’re putting employees first

Employees are at the core of an authentic organizational purpose. Where, how, and why we work will be transformed by COVID-19 as companies realize the vital role that all levels of employees play in the overall health and success of their business. Companies are not only instituting enhanced or extended sick leave benefits and policies, but increasing pay for frontline workers (Campbell’s, CarMax, Corning, Nestlé), freezing layoffs (Danone, Yum Brands), providing spot bonuses or childcare support (Workday, PwC), and more.

2. They’re responding with creativity and innovation

Companies across sectors are creatively utilizing their products, services, and operational capabilities in response to the pandemic. Unilever took fast action to ease the financial instability for their most vulnerable small and medium-size suppliers by pledging early payments, technology companies are giving their services away for free or lending supercomputing power to researchers, and manufacturers are redirecting their capabilities and manpower to create medical devices. Apparel companies are directing their materials and personnel toward making nonmedical masks to help slow the spread of the disease, while others are halting normal production to manufacture PPE for healthcare professionals.

3. They’re collaborating with others

Despite mixed political messages from leaders around the world, companies, NGOs, and individuals are self-organizing to do the right thing. Companies are collaborating with their peers and with governmental and NGO entities to find creative solutions, from developing a vaccine to 3D-printing medical devices to opting for underutilized shipping lanes for faster delivery times. Lineage Logistics, a cold storage, food transport and processing company, joined supply chain and nonprofit partners to create the “Share a Meal” campaign. Through this, Lineage will provide 100 million meals to Americans in need, guided by their purpose “To Feed the World.” More than 110 live event companies in the U.S. have come together in a coalition, called Live for Life, that is lending construction capabilities, logistics expertise, raw material inventories, and labor to build temporary hospital rooms, testing centers, and emergency treatment rooms.

4. They’re evolving their own purpose

When society eventually begins to normalize, the concept of purpose will be forever changed. Employees, consumers, communities, and supply chain partners will expect even more of companies to provide a safety net to their needs: for healthcare, sick leave policies, rebalancing of work and family life, and support for their local communities. Companies will act more selflessly and based on deeply set values that continue to earn them a license to operate and to lead. Most of all, they’ll take what they learned from the pandemic and reprioritize what matters most.

Whether you’re a company evolving your purpose through the pandemic, or realizing the vital need for purpose, I hope you consider the following: Evaluate the new needs of all stakeholders, not just shareholders, to respond to the zeitgeist shift to a “stakeholder capitalism” model. Listen. Observe. Utilize all your resources, not just funds: people, products, services, operations, and partners. Evolve the empathetic actions taken during the pandemic to serve employees first, then customers, citizens, and communities. Embrace the humanity, interconnectedness, and kindness we have seen from so many throughout this pandemic and emulate those behaviors in your business culture, operations, and future community engagement.

Carol Cone, CEO of Carol Cone On Purpose, is one of the foremost experts in social purpose, having pioneered early social impact initiatives in the 1980s. She champions innovation in social purpose, continually working to accelerate its evolution for business and social impact with the power to change the world.

Kristin Kenney, Senior Associate at Carol Cone ON PURPOSE, has spent her career helping dozens of private and public sector companies bring their social impact to life. She firmly believes that business can and should profit with purpose.


Full/More Story at Source
The COVID-19 pandemic is sparking an era of ‘smart generosity’

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Pay A Visit : SCUC-CCP :: Selective Cause Until it is Concluded : Coronavirus Covid-19 Pandemic

31

Covid-19 news: UK coronavirus alert level lowered from four to three

New Scientist Default Image

TOLGA AKMEN/AFP via Getty Images

Latest coronavirus news as of 5 pm on 19 June

UK coronavirus alert level lowered from four to three

The UK’s chief medical officers today said the country’s coronavirus alert level has reduced from four to three. This level of the alert system corresponds to the virus being in general circulation, but at a level where it’s possible to gradually relax some restrictions. However, restrictions in England have already been progressively relaxed throughout June, even while the alert level remained at four – which corresponds to high or exponentially rising levels of the virus and warrants continued social distancing.

For the first time, the government today published the daily rate at which coronavirus infections are growing, alongside the UK’s R number, which remains unchanged at around 0.7 to 0.9. For the UK as a whole, the growth rate is believed to be anywhere between -2 per cent and -4 per cent, meaning that infection numbers are declining slightly. At a regional level there is a chance that new cases may be growing in London. However, the government’s science advisers believe that growth in infection numbers is unlikely.

Advertisement

Other coronavirus news  

People from South Asian backgrounds in the UK are 20 per cent more likely to die from covid-19 in hospital than white people, according to a preliminary study that analysed data on patients at 260 hospitals. This disparity was partly explained by higher levels of diabetes, the researchers who did the study told the BBC

China’s Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says that genetic analysis suggests that the coronavirus causing a new outbreak in the capital Beijing probably came from Europe. Earlier this week, CDC director Gao Fu said the virus may have been spreading in Beijing as early as the start of May.

Microbiologists at University College London, UK, are calling for widespread surveillance of pets, livestock and wild animals to measure the prevalence of coronavirus. There have been limited studies on animal susceptibility to the virus, they wrote in a commentary published in The Lancet Microbe on Thursday, with conflicting data on some animals, such as pigs.

Coronavirus deaths

New Scientist Default Image

Matthew Rowett

The worldwide death toll has passed 454,000. The number of confirmed cases is more than 8.5 million, according to the map and dashboard from Johns Hopkins University, though the true number of cases will be much higher.

Latest on coronavirus from New Scientist

Threat to Amazon’s indigenous communities: Members of indigenous communities in the Peruvian Amazon have contracted covid-19, fuelling concerns that the disease could devastate indigenous groups throughout South America – including uncontacted tribes in the region. Many fear whole communities could be killed if they contract the virus.

Essential information about coronavirus

What is covid-19?

What are the worst symptoms and how deadly is covid-19?

You could be spreading the coronavirus without realising you’ve got it

How many people have been infected with the coronavirus?

What does evidence say about schools reopening?

What to read, watch and listen to about coronavirus

Covid-19 Fact Checkers, a podcast from Vice, pairs up young people with experts who can answer their questions relating to the pandemic. A recent episode focused on why people in the UK from black, Asian and minority ethnic backgrounds are being disproportionately affected by covid-19.

Can You Save The World? is a coronavirus social distancing game, where the player travels through a city and gains points for saving lives by practising social distancing correctly and collecting masks. 

What coronavirus looks like in every country on Earth is a 28-minute film from Channel 4 News showing what daily life looks like in every country from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe.

Coronavirus, Explained on Netflix is a short documentary series examining the on-going coronavirus pandemic, the efforts to fight it and ways to manage its mental health toll.

Coronavirus: The science of a pandemic: As the death toll from covid-19 rises, discover how researchers around the world are racing to understand the virus and prevent future outbreaks in our free online panel discussion.

A day in the life of coronavirus Britain is an uplifting Channel 4 documentary shot over 24 hours which shows how the citizens of Britain are coping under lockdown.

New Scientist Weekly features updates and analysis on the latest developments in the covid-19 pandemic. Our podcast sees expert journalists from the magazine discuss the biggest science stories to hit the headlines each week – from technology and space, to health and the environment.

The Rules of Contagion is about the new science of contagion and the surprising ways it shapes our lives and behaviour. The author, Adam Kucharski, is an epidemiologist at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK, and in the book he examines how diseases spread and why they stop.

Coronavirus trajectory tracker explained, a video by John Burn-Murdoch for the Financial Times, uses data visualisation to explain the daily graphs that show how coronavirus cases and deaths are growing around the world.

Contagion: The BBC Four Pandemic is a sober documentary about the progression of a hypothetical pandemic which the BBC simulated in 2017. Fronted by science journalist and TV presenter Hannah Fry, and made with the support of some of the country’s best epidemiologists and mathematical modelers, it’s very relevant to today’s covid-19 pandemic.

Previous update

middle aged young looking white female sits at home reading through Covid19 home testing kit supplied by UK government

Julian Claxton / Alamy

18 June

NHS Test and Trace still not reaching enough contacts of coronavirus cases

The UK government’s contact tracing scheme for England only reached 73 per cent of people diagnosed with coronavirus between 4 and 10 June, government figures revealed today. This falls short of the 80 per cent target recommended by the government’s Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) for the second week in a row. Of the 5949 people who tested positive for coronavirus during this time, NHS Test and Trace only managed to contact 4366. Yesterday, Independent SAGE – an alternative group of scientists – published a report saying the 80 per cent target is currently “impossible” to meet.

In addition, not everyone contacted by NHS Test and Trace was reached quickly enough. Only 75 per cent of people who were contacted were reached within the government’s target of 24 hours. 8.6 per cent of people were only contacted after 72 hours, when the chance that an infected person has already spread the virus is high

The BBC revealed today that the government’s covid-19 contact tracing smartphone app will now use the decentralised system supported by Apple and Google, after trials on the Isle of Wight found the government’s centralised system could only detect 4 per cent of iPhones and 75 per cent of Android phones. The app won’t be ready before winter, according to the minister responsible for it.

Other coronavirus news

350,000 people in Beijing, China have been contacted to arrange testing and 22 million people in the city are now under lockdown conditions after a new outbreak of coronavirus cases linked to the Xinfadi food market. The new outbreak may have started a month earlier than first thought, due to some people not experiencing symptoms, said Gao Fu, the director of China’s Center for Disease Control and Prevention at a seminar on Tuesday. Officials in Beijing reported 21 new coronavirus cases today, down from 31 on Wednesday and bringing the new outbreak’s total to 158 cases.

An estimated 33,000 people in England outside of hospitals and care homes had covid-19 between 31 May and 13 June, according to preliminary results from a random swab testing survey by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). This is lower than the 149,000 people thought to have been infected between 3 and 16 May and is consistent with ONS modelling that suggests the number of people testing positive in England has been falling since 26 April.

An American Airlines passenger was removed from a flight on Wednesday after refusing to wear a face covering in accordance with the airline’s new covid-19 safety policy, introduced earlier this week.  

Coronavirus deaths

New Scientist Default Image

Matthew Rowett

The worldwide death toll has passed 449,000. The number of confirmed cases is more than 8.3 million, according to the map and dashboard from Johns Hopkins University, though the true number of cases will be much higher.

Latest on coronavirus from New Scientist

How many people have had coronavirus?: Statistics are trickling in from cities and countries around the world, but the figures vary hugely from 1 per cent of the population to more than half. How are these figures calculated, and which can we trust?

Viruses to watch out for: Several types of viruses could pose a global threat, not just the coronavirus that causes covid-19.

Four major global public health threats: Viral pandemics aren’t the only worry: antibiotic resistance, a drop in vaccination and other issues could rapidly put the world’s health in peril.

Click here to see previous daily updates

More on these topics:


Full/More Story at Source
Covid-19 news: UK coronavirus alert level lowered from four to three

Have A Say ?

Pay A Visit : SCUC-CCP :: Selective Cause Until it is Concluded : Coronavirus Covid-19 Pandemic

22

Brazil passes 50,000 coronavirus deaths

The grim milestone comes days after Brazil confirmed more than one million Covid-19 cases.


Full/More Story at Source
Brazil passes 50,000 coronavirus deathsCoronavirus – BBC News

Get full coverage of the Coronavirus pandemic including the latest news, analysis, advice and explainers from across the UK and around the world.

Have A Say ?

Pay A Visit : SCUC-CCP

30

Is a second wave of coronavirus on the way?

What are second waves and how big a problem are they?


Full/More Story at Source
Is a second wave of coronavirus on the way?Coronavirus – BBC News

Get full coverage of the Coronavirus pandemic including the latest news, analysis, advice and explainers from across the UK and around the world.

Have A Say ?

Pay A Visit : SCUC-CCP

23

Coronavirus: COVID-19 pandemic

Overcrowding, poor ventilation and infrastructures, deficient health, hygiene and sanitation conditions favours the spread of infectious diseases, such as COVID-19, which can rapidly affect a large number of people inside detention facilities. ICRC

In addition to supporting frail health systems which may be vulnerable to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) works in close coordination with authorities to understand what kind of protective measures they put in place in the detention facilities to prevent the spread of coronavirus there and also to remind them to include the detainees in the national plans on coronavirus.

Detention facilities, which are overcrowded, suffer from poor hygiene or lack ventilation, pose an extra challenge when it comes to preventing and containing infectious diseases, including the coronavirus COVID-19

The ICRC works together with relevant authorities in many places of detention around the world to strengthen standard practices such as the medical screening of new arrivals and the setting up of prevention measures – such as hand washing stations – for detainees, visitors, guards and delivery personnel.

“Detention facilities in places of conflict pose a great challenge for authorities working to prevent and contain COVID-19.” 
— Esperanza Martinez, ICRC’s head of global health

The danger of coronavirus pandemic extends beyond those in confinement; people who have been displaced by conflict are often particularly vulnerable to health complications or worse — being exposed to the coronavirus COVID-19 outbreak. Their temporary accommodation or camps can be crowded, often with inadequate sanitation and shelter or little access to medical care and good nutrition. We must think of their well-being and ability to access the information and health care they need in the event of an outbreak.

In disease outbreaks, particularly in the case of the coronavirus COVID-19, facts, not fear, help people protect themselves and their loved ones. The Red Cross and Red Crescent family is educating the public about the coronavirus, sharing prevention information in order to prevent misinformation and reduce rumours, and encouraging communities to practice social distancing for their own safety.


Full/More Story at Source
Coronavirus: COVID-19 pandemic

Have A Say ?

Pay A Visit : SCUC-CCP :: Selective Cause Until it is Concluded : Coronavirus Covid-19 Pandemic

26

Add Story/ Your Say Until the Cause is Concluded
[*Select Category/Tag:

Coronavirus Covid-19 Pandemic
at Your Next Publish Screen.]

The COVID-19 pandemic is sparking an era of ‘smart generosity’

The COVID-19 pandemic is sparking an era of ‘smart generosity’

The COVID-19 pandemic is sparking an era of ‘smart generosity’

UPDATES: COVID-19

By Carol Cone and Kristin Kenney4 minute Read

During challenging times, companies with purpose are often better positioned to adapt and endure than peers without a purpose. Why? Purpose serves as a vision and lens for smart decision-making during both good times and bad. More than just a reason for existing, purpose can help leaders prioritize stakeholders, redirect resources, and more precisely respond during crises such as COVID-19.

Historically, what we today call purpose is based on the evolution of various linkages between companies and causes, from philanthropy and cause branding to corporate citizenship and CSR. COVID-19 is forcing the next iteration of purpose, one that falls in line with the emerging stakeholder capitalism movement. This is taking shape as “smart generosity”—the innovative application of a company’s resources (cash, personnel, operations, reinvented products/services) toward an urgent social issue, which puts the needs of stakeholders before short-term profits.

Think: Allstate returning $600 million in premiums back to customers who are driving less; Microsoft offering 12 weeks’ paid parental leave to any full-time employee juggling homeschool with work; or Dick’s Sporting Goods’ CEO and president forgoing their salaries for the year.

Given the unprecedented nature of this pandemic, these corporate actions were not planned for or forecasted. But many were guided by a core purpose, strong corporate values, and a commitment to do the right thing for all stakeholders—not just shareholders. In fact, “shareholders come last” in the pandemic, Mark Cuban said to Just Capital. We will only come back stronger if companies focus on supporting their employees and all the other stakeholders critical to their business growth.

Here’s how companies are putting their purpose to work through smart generosity:

1. They’re putting employees first

Employees are at the core of an authentic organizational purpose. Where, how, and why we work will be transformed by COVID-19 as companies realize the vital role that all levels of employees play in the overall health and success of their business. Companies are not only instituting enhanced or extended sick leave benefits and policies, but increasing pay for frontline workers (Campbell’s, CarMax, Corning, Nestlé), freezing layoffs (Danone, Yum Brands), providing spot bonuses or childcare support (Workday, PwC), and more.

2. They’re responding with creativity and innovation

Companies across sectors are creatively utilizing their products, services, and operational capabilities in response to the pandemic. Unilever took fast action to ease the financial instability for their most vulnerable small and medium-size suppliers by pledging early payments, technology companies are giving their services away for free or lending supercomputing power to researchers, and manufacturers are redirecting their capabilities and manpower to create medical devices. Apparel companies are directing their materials and personnel toward making nonmedical masks to help slow the spread of the disease, while others are halting normal production to manufacture PPE for healthcare professionals.

3. They’re collaborating with others

Despite mixed political messages from leaders around the world, companies, NGOs, and individuals are self-organizing to do the right thing. Companies are collaborating with their peers and with governmental and NGO entities to find creative solutions, from developing a vaccine to 3D-printing medical devices to opting for underutilized shipping lanes for faster delivery times. Lineage Logistics, a cold storage, food transport and processing company, joined supply chain and nonprofit partners to create the “Share a Meal” campaign. Through this, Lineage will provide 100 million meals to Americans in need, guided by their purpose “To Feed the World.” More than 110 live event companies in the U.S. have come together in a coalition, called Live for Life, that is lending construction capabilities, logistics expertise, raw material inventories, and labor to build temporary hospital rooms, testing centers, and emergency treatment rooms.

4. They’re evolving their own purpose

When society eventually begins to normalize, the concept of purpose will be forever changed. Employees, consumers, communities, and supply chain partners will expect even more of companies to provide a safety net to their needs: for healthcare, sick leave policies, rebalancing of work and family life, and support for their local communities. Companies will act more selflessly and based on deeply set values that continue to earn them a license to operate and to lead. Most of all, they’ll take what they learned from the pandemic and reprioritize what matters most.

Whether you’re a company evolving your purpose through the pandemic, or realizing the vital need for purpose, I hope you consider the following: Evaluate the new needs of all stakeholders, not just shareholders, to respond to the zeitgeist shift to a “stakeholder capitalism” model. Listen. Observe. Utilize all your resources, not just funds: people, products, services, operations, and partners. Evolve the empathetic actions taken during the pandemic to serve employees first, then customers, citizens, and communities. Embrace the humanity, interconnectedness, and kindness we have seen from so many throughout this pandemic and emulate those behaviors in your business culture, operations, and future community engagement.

Carol Cone, CEO of Carol Cone On Purpose, is one of the foremost experts in social purpose, having pioneered early social impact initiatives in the 1980s. She champions innovation in social purpose, continually working to accelerate its evolution for business and social impact with the power to change the world.

Kristin Kenney, Senior Associate at Carol Cone ON PURPOSE, has spent her career helping dozens of private and public sector companies bring their social impact to life. She firmly believes that business can and should profit with purpose.


Full/More Story at Source
The COVID-19 pandemic is sparking an era of ‘smart generosity’

Have A Say ?

Pay A Visit : SCUC-CCP :: Selective Cause Until it is Concluded : Coronavirus Covid-19 Pandemic

31

Covid-19 news: UK coronavirus alert level lowered from four to three

Covid-19 news: UK coronavirus alert level lowered from four to three

New Scientist Default Image

TOLGA AKMEN/AFP via Getty Images

Latest coronavirus news as of 5 pm on 19 June

UK coronavirus alert level lowered from four to three

The UK’s chief medical officers today said the country’s coronavirus alert level has reduced from four to three. This level of the alert system corresponds to the virus being in general circulation, but at a level where it’s possible to gradually relax some restrictions. However, restrictions in England have already been progressively relaxed throughout June, even while the alert level remained at four – which corresponds to high or exponentially rising levels of the virus and warrants continued social distancing.

For the first time, the government today published the daily rate at which coronavirus infections are growing, alongside the UK’s R number, which remains unchanged at around 0.7 to 0.9. For the UK as a whole, the growth rate is believed to be anywhere between -2 per cent and -4 per cent, meaning that infection numbers are declining slightly. At a regional level there is a chance that new cases may be growing in London. However, the government’s science advisers believe that growth in infection numbers is unlikely.

Advertisement

Other coronavirus news  

People from South Asian backgrounds in the UK are 20 per cent more likely to die from covid-19 in hospital than white people, according to a preliminary study that analysed data on patients at 260 hospitals. This disparity was partly explained by higher levels of diabetes, the researchers who did the study told the BBC

China’s Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says that genetic analysis suggests that the coronavirus causing a new outbreak in the capital Beijing probably came from Europe. Earlier this week, CDC director Gao Fu said the virus may have been spreading in Beijing as early as the start of May.

Microbiologists at University College London, UK, are calling for widespread surveillance of pets, livestock and wild animals to measure the prevalence of coronavirus. There have been limited studies on animal susceptibility to the virus, they wrote in a commentary published in The Lancet Microbe on Thursday, with conflicting data on some animals, such as pigs.

Coronavirus deaths

New Scientist Default Image

Matthew Rowett

The worldwide death toll has passed 454,000. The number of confirmed cases is more than 8.5 million, according to the map and dashboard from Johns Hopkins University, though the true number of cases will be much higher.

Latest on coronavirus from New Scientist

Threat to Amazon’s indigenous communities: Members of indigenous communities in the Peruvian Amazon have contracted covid-19, fuelling concerns that the disease could devastate indigenous groups throughout South America – including uncontacted tribes in the region. Many fear whole communities could be killed if they contract the virus.

Essential information about coronavirus

What is covid-19?

What are the worst symptoms and how deadly is covid-19?

You could be spreading the coronavirus without realising you’ve got it

How many people have been infected with the coronavirus?

What does evidence say about schools reopening?

What to read, watch and listen to about coronavirus

Covid-19 Fact Checkers, a podcast from Vice, pairs up young people with experts who can answer their questions relating to the pandemic. A recent episode focused on why people in the UK from black, Asian and minority ethnic backgrounds are being disproportionately affected by covid-19.

Can You Save The World? is a coronavirus social distancing game, where the player travels through a city and gains points for saving lives by practising social distancing correctly and collecting masks. 

What coronavirus looks like in every country on Earth is a 28-minute film from Channel 4 News showing what daily life looks like in every country from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe.

Coronavirus, Explained on Netflix is a short documentary series examining the on-going coronavirus pandemic, the efforts to fight it and ways to manage its mental health toll.

Coronavirus: The science of a pandemic: As the death toll from covid-19 rises, discover how researchers around the world are racing to understand the virus and prevent future outbreaks in our free online panel discussion.

A day in the life of coronavirus Britain is an uplifting Channel 4 documentary shot over 24 hours which shows how the citizens of Britain are coping under lockdown.

New Scientist Weekly features updates and analysis on the latest developments in the covid-19 pandemic. Our podcast sees expert journalists from the magazine discuss the biggest science stories to hit the headlines each week – from technology and space, to health and the environment.

The Rules of Contagion is about the new science of contagion and the surprising ways it shapes our lives and behaviour. The author, Adam Kucharski, is an epidemiologist at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK, and in the book he examines how diseases spread and why they stop.

Coronavirus trajectory tracker explained, a video by John Burn-Murdoch for the Financial Times, uses data visualisation to explain the daily graphs that show how coronavirus cases and deaths are growing around the world.

Contagion: The BBC Four Pandemic is a sober documentary about the progression of a hypothetical pandemic which the BBC simulated in 2017. Fronted by science journalist and TV presenter Hannah Fry, and made with the support of some of the country’s best epidemiologists and mathematical modelers, it’s very relevant to today’s covid-19 pandemic.

Previous update

middle aged young looking white female sits at home reading through Covid19 home testing kit supplied by UK government

Julian Claxton / Alamy

18 June

NHS Test and Trace still not reaching enough contacts of coronavirus cases

The UK government’s contact tracing scheme for England only reached 73 per cent of people diagnosed with coronavirus between 4 and 10 June, government figures revealed today. This falls short of the 80 per cent target recommended by the government’s Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) for the second week in a row. Of the 5949 people who tested positive for coronavirus during this time, NHS Test and Trace only managed to contact 4366. Yesterday, Independent SAGE – an alternative group of scientists – published a report saying the 80 per cent target is currently “impossible” to meet.

In addition, not everyone contacted by NHS Test and Trace was reached quickly enough. Only 75 per cent of people who were contacted were reached within the government’s target of 24 hours. 8.6 per cent of people were only contacted after 72 hours, when the chance that an infected person has already spread the virus is high

The BBC revealed today that the government’s covid-19 contact tracing smartphone app will now use the decentralised system supported by Apple and Google, after trials on the Isle of Wight found the government’s centralised system could only detect 4 per cent of iPhones and 75 per cent of Android phones. The app won’t be ready before winter, according to the minister responsible for it.

Other coronavirus news

350,000 people in Beijing, China have been contacted to arrange testing and 22 million people in the city are now under lockdown conditions after a new outbreak of coronavirus cases linked to the Xinfadi food market. The new outbreak may have started a month earlier than first thought, due to some people not experiencing symptoms, said Gao Fu, the director of China’s Center for Disease Control and Prevention at a seminar on Tuesday. Officials in Beijing reported 21 new coronavirus cases today, down from 31 on Wednesday and bringing the new outbreak’s total to 158 cases.

An estimated 33,000 people in England outside of hospitals and care homes had covid-19 between 31 May and 13 June, according to preliminary results from a random swab testing survey by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). This is lower than the 149,000 people thought to have been infected between 3 and 16 May and is consistent with ONS modelling that suggests the number of people testing positive in England has been falling since 26 April.

An American Airlines passenger was removed from a flight on Wednesday after refusing to wear a face covering in accordance with the airline’s new covid-19 safety policy, introduced earlier this week.  

Coronavirus deaths

New Scientist Default Image

Matthew Rowett

The worldwide death toll has passed 449,000. The number of confirmed cases is more than 8.3 million, according to the map and dashboard from Johns Hopkins University, though the true number of cases will be much higher.

Latest on coronavirus from New Scientist

How many people have had coronavirus?: Statistics are trickling in from cities and countries around the world, but the figures vary hugely from 1 per cent of the population to more than half. How are these figures calculated, and which can we trust?

Viruses to watch out for: Several types of viruses could pose a global threat, not just the coronavirus that causes covid-19.

Four major global public health threats: Viral pandemics aren’t the only worry: antibiotic resistance, a drop in vaccination and other issues could rapidly put the world’s health in peril.

Click here to see previous daily updates

More on these topics:


Full/More Story at Source
Covid-19 news: UK coronavirus alert level lowered from four to three

Have A Say ?

Pay A Visit : SCUC-CCP :: Selective Cause Until it is Concluded : Coronavirus Covid-19 Pandemic

22

Brazil passes 50,000 coronavirus deaths

Brazil passes 50,000 coronavirus deaths

The grim milestone comes days after Brazil confirmed more than one million Covid-19 cases.


Full/More Story at Source
Brazil passes 50,000 coronavirus deathsCoronavirus – BBC News

Get full coverage of the Coronavirus pandemic including the latest news, analysis, advice and explainers from across the UK and around the world.

Have A Say ?

Pay A Visit : SCUC-CCP

30

Is a second wave of coronavirus on the way?

Is a second wave of coronavirus on the way?

What are second waves and how big a problem are they?


Full/More Story at Source
Is a second wave of coronavirus on the way?Coronavirus – BBC News

Get full coverage of the Coronavirus pandemic including the latest news, analysis, advice and explainers from across the UK and around the world.

Have A Say ?

Pay A Visit : SCUC-CCP

23

Coronavirus: COVID-19 pandemic

Coronavirus: COVID-19 pandemic

Overcrowding, poor ventilation and infrastructures, deficient health, hygiene and sanitation conditions favours the spread of infectious diseases, such as COVID-19, which can rapidly affect a large number of people inside detention facilities. ICRC

In addition to supporting frail health systems which may be vulnerable to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) works in close coordination with authorities to understand what kind of protective measures they put in place in the detention facilities to prevent the spread of coronavirus there and also to remind them to include the detainees in the national plans on coronavirus.

Detention facilities, which are overcrowded, suffer from poor hygiene or lack ventilation, pose an extra challenge when it comes to preventing and containing infectious diseases, including the coronavirus COVID-19

The ICRC works together with relevant authorities in many places of detention around the world to strengthen standard practices such as the medical screening of new arrivals and the setting up of prevention measures – such as hand washing stations – for detainees, visitors, guards and delivery personnel.

“Detention facilities in places of conflict pose a great challenge for authorities working to prevent and contain COVID-19.” 
— Esperanza Martinez, ICRC’s head of global health

The danger of coronavirus pandemic extends beyond those in confinement; people who have been displaced by conflict are often particularly vulnerable to health complications or worse — being exposed to the coronavirus COVID-19 outbreak. Their temporary accommodation or camps can be crowded, often with inadequate sanitation and shelter or little access to medical care and good nutrition. We must think of their well-being and ability to access the information and health care they need in the event of an outbreak.

In disease outbreaks, particularly in the case of the coronavirus COVID-19, facts, not fear, help people protect themselves and their loved ones. The Red Cross and Red Crescent family is educating the public about the coronavirus, sharing prevention information in order to prevent misinformation and reduce rumours, and encouraging communities to practice social distancing for their own safety.


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